What size of tires can you fit on your Land Rover?

Updated: Jul 18, 2021


One of the most common questions we hear is regarding tire size. "What size tires can I fit on my Land Rover?" This is information we've compiled for Discovery I, Discovery II, Range Rover Classic, and P38, Defender, LR3 and LR4, and last but not least the new Defender 2.


The allure of upgrading to larger tires is real, it can make your vehicle look tougher, and can have some real world benefits. Many owners are looking to gain some advantage in ground clearance without the expense and work required to add a suspension and/or Body lift. However, there are physical limitations as to how much Rubber you can sneak under the body before you have issues with rubbing. Adding larger tires can bring new challenges and headaches such as rubbing on frame or body. Because it also changes the gear ratio, it adds stress to the drivetrain. At some point you might want to look at changing gearing, and/or other suspension and drivetrain components such as upgraded drive shafts, or Axles. Ultimately, moving to a larger tire means you'll use more gas and will go slower.


This brings us back to the questions, what is your purpose for larger tires, what will you be using your vehicle for? Are you building your rig to go Overlanding, Rock crawling, weekend camping, or something else, Things that need to be taken into consideration-are: How much lift are you looking to achieve? Are you willing to sacrifice ride quality, handling, convenience, and economy, and if so how much? What is your budget? Other things to take into consideration include, are you going to be traveling outside of the country, if so you might want to try to stick to a size that can be found where you are going to be headed just in case you run into problems and need to replace one. The type of tire is important depending on what your main purpose is, do you get an M/T, an AT, a hybrid, etc. (We'll go more into that in another post.)


The following information has compiled to the best of our knowledge, however, before taking the plunge it's not a bad idea to double check things yourself. Keep in mind it is a general guide, we've seen variance from one vehicle to another, but this should give you some sort of idea. Also, it is best viewed on a computer or in desktop mode/desktop site view on your phone or mobile device.


Defender (older)

Tire size Diameter Width Notes

32" 265/75 R16 31.6" 10.4" stock size tire.

235/85 R16 31.7" 9.3" same size as stock but narrower.

33" 255/85 R16 33.1" 10"

285/75 R16 32.8" 11.2"

33x12.5 33" 12.5"

34" 305/75 R16 34" 12"

35x12.5 35" 12.5"


Defender 2 (2020 ->)

Tire size Diameter Width Notes

30" 265/60 R 18 30.5" 10.4"

32" 275/55 R20 31.9" 10.8"

255/70 R18 32.1" 10" LR OEM (Do not fit the P400).

255/65 R19 32.1" 10" LR OEM.

255/60 R20 32" 10" LR OEM.

265/60 R20 32.5" 10.4" May rub wheel well at full turn - may require

33" slight mods to wheel well liner.

275/60 R20 33" 10.8" Will rub wheel well liner, and may require

some modifications including lift Rods.



Discovery I, Discovery II, Range Rover Classic, P38

These vehicles all share something in common: they all ran 29" diameter tires from the factory. They came with either 16" or 18" wheels, and because of the similarities among their body and chassis, most of the same tires will be fairly similar in how they fit, and will require similar upgrades or changes in suspension to fit larger tires. We've only included sizes that will fit on factory 16" or 18" rims, since there are a ton of other aftermarket tire/wheel combos, but this should give you a good starting point.


29" Tire size Diameter Width Notes

205r16 28.9" 205mm (8.07") 29" is the factor diameter no interference

205/80 R16 28.9" 8.1" with chassis or body.

225/70 R16 28.4"-28.7" 10"

255/65 R16 29.1" 10"

225 75 R16 29.2"-29.4" 8.9"

235/70 R16 28.7"-29.0" 9.3"

255/55 R18 29" 10"

245/70 R16 29.5" 9.6"


30" 215/85 R16 30.3"-30.4" 8.5" Generally no problem on a stock

235/75 R16 29.7"-29.9" 9.3" suspension, however wider tires may

245/70 R16 29.5"-30.4" 9.6" tend to rub the frame at full steering

255/70 R16 30"-30.2" 10" lock. Adjustments on steering stops

265/70 R16 30.6" 10.4" could help.

255/60 R18 30" 10"

235/65 R18 30" 9.3"

245/60 R18 29.6" 9.6"


31" 265/70 R16 30.6"-30.7" 10.4" No body modifications will be needed,

275/70 R16 31.1"-31.2" 10.8" But expect front tires will rub the frame

265/60 R18 30.3"-30.6" 10.4" without adjustments to steering stops.

275/65 R18 31.1" 10.8"

255/65 R18 31.1" 10"


32" 235/85 R16 31.7"-31.9" 9.3" Front tires may rub on frame when

265/75 R16 31.6"-31.9" 10.4" turning on factory suspension. Body

*255/70 R18 32.0"-32.1" 10" contact at all four tires likely at full

265/65 R18 31.5"-31.6" 10.4" articulation. 2" lift recommended and

275/65 R18 32"-32.3" 10.8" possible fender trimming.


33" 285/75 R16 32.8"-33.1" 11.2" Not recommended for stock

295/75 R16 33.3"-33.4" 11.6" suspension, tires will contact frame and

255/85 R16 33.1" 10" body. A 2"-3" lift is recommended, as

*265/70 R18 32.2"-32.8" 10.4" well as trimming fenders. Tires are likely

*275/70 R18 33.2"-33.8" 10.8" to still rub frame at full steering lock

and articulation/ compression. Stability

on-road will be compromised.

34" 295/70 R18 34.3"-34.4" 11.6" Minimum 3" lift recommended for any

285/75 R18 34.8" 11.2" tires over 33". Body trimming will also be

required. Because a 3" lift plus 34" tire

will raise the body 5.5" higher than stock,

on-road stability will be compromised.

These tires are very wide, consider

upgrading axles & getting lower gearing.


*Common stock tire size on other vehicles, easy to find, often referred to as "take off" tires for those upgrading other non-Land rover vehicles, such as Jeeps, or pickup trucks


A great resource for checking dimensions of various tire sizes is tiresize.com. You can compare tire sizes, look at a visualizer, check alternate sizes, etc.




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